Art on Tuesday: Flower Viewing

spring landscape with mount fuji by hokusai 36 views of mount fuji

This picture is an additional ukiyo-e from Hokusai’s series ‘Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji’. It is called ‘Tōkaidō Shinagawa Goten’yama no Fuji (東海道品川御殿山の不二)’. Mount Fuji seen from the Gotenyama hill in Shinagawa.

You see a scene in springtime. The trees with flowers in bloom. People are celebrating ‘hanami’ 花見, which means flower viewing. They are having a picnic on the hill or take a walk in the beautiful countryside. It is a tradition until today to do ‘hanami’ with family and friends or colleagues, enjoying the cherry blossoms and sit under a tree, drinking sake, eating and sing songs. Everybody is enjoying the coming of spring.

The Making of Japanese Woodblock Prints

triptych by Utagawa Kunisada process of ukiyo-e makingThis triptych presents seven women working at different workstations showing the process of woodblock printmaking, although women were not typically working as artists or crafters in the Edo era. This picture, a woodblock print itself, was made by Utagawa Kunisada (歌川 国貞 1786–1865) in 1857. On the left we see the painter with different colors and brushes. Wood carvers are working in the back at small tables. The person in the middle is brushing on paper, and the woman on the right is sharpening tools.

The making of Japanese woodblock prints is a complex and laborious process:

  • It is always a collaboration between artists, wood carvers, printers and publishers.
  • First, the painter is drawing the artwork on paper, using black ink with a brush. These outlines are called hanshita-e.
  • Second, a skilled wood carver is laying this drawing on a wooden plate and carves the outlines into the wood. Most commonly cherry wood is used in Japan.
  • The painter produces more different hanshita-e for each color. These are also handed over to a carver, who produces several woodcuts accordingly.
  • These woodcuts are now used as printing-plates one after another. Usually painter and printer discuss the printing order.
  • This woodblock-printing technique was established in the 1760s in Japan. It is called nishiki-e 錦絵. The style was made popular by the artist Suzuki Harunobu (鈴木 春信 1725-1770). It was also used later for the ukiyo-e, which became famous in the Edo era, and are therefore known as Edo-e 江戸絵.

Examples for black and white hanshita-e

hanshita-e by Hokusai Drawings (hanshita-e) for a three-volume picture book from Hokusai Katsushika (1760-1849). The drawing was made in 1823-33. (Picture source: https://collections.mfa.org/download/129501)

Utagawa Yoshimune (1817–1880) ca. 1860, from the chapters 4, 5 of Legends of the Dog Warriors. (Picture source: https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/78752)

Video
For a better understanding the following YouTube videos show the fascinating process of Japanese woodblock printing:

1. Japanese Woodblock Printmaking
“Local printmaker Jennifer Worsley demonstrates the Japanese woodblock printmaking process, also known as moku hanga, using a mix of traditional and contemporary techniques and tools.”

2. Woodblock Printing Process – A Japan Journey
“Tokyo-based woodblock printmaker David Bull narrates a video showing the step-by-step process of making one of the woodblock prints in the 2019 subscription series ‘A Japan Journey’, designed by Jed Henry.”

Art on Tuesday: Dawn at Isawa

woodblock print by Hokusai -Dawn at Isawa
This ukiyo-e is from the series ‘Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji’ 富嶽三十六景 by Hokusai (1760-1849).
The series was made in the early 1830s. This is picture No. 43 with the title ‘Dawn at Isawa in the Kai Province’ (甲州伊沢暁—kôshû isawa no akatsuki). The Kai province is located in today’s Yamanashi prefecture of Japan. Here you see typical historical Japanese houses with thatched roofs. On the middle road groups of merchants are transporting commercial goods, some on horses. They are carrying items like rice, food and various products in wooden boxes or in bundles.

Art on Tuesday: Tama River

‘Autumn Moon on the Tama River’ 多摩川秋月 is part of Utagawa Hiroshige’s series ‘Eight Views in the Environs of Edo’ 江戸近郊八景之内 made around 1837/38. It depicts the  beautiful atmosphere of early autumn.

The Tama River flows through Tokyo and is the border of Kanagawa. A main river of Japan with a lenght of ca. 138 km. The river is very popular among inhabitants of the area and tourists because of the beauty of the landscape. Many people enjoy a walk or a picnic at the shore.

Katsushika Hokusai  shows the Tama River in his series the ‘Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji’ (富嶽三十六景 Fugaku Sanjūrokkei). The title is called ‘Tama River in Musashi Province’ 武州玉川 painted in 1830 to 1832.

 

Art on Tuesday: Canary and Peony


This beautiful ukiyo-e  was made by Katsushika Hokusai (葛飾 北斎) in 1834. It is showing a flying canary in between peonies. The rich blue background and the pastel flowers are showing an interesting effect.

Peonies are growing in Asia, Western North America and Southern Europe. They are called 恵比須草 (ebisugusa, paeonia lactiflora) in Japanese. The roots of peonies are used as traditional medicine in China. Therefore they are regarded as a traditional floral symbol of wealth and nobility, also for good luck. Canaries 金糸雀 (kanaria) are a symbol of freshness and healing energies.