Three Interesting Japanese Books published in 2021

book cover Murakami Haruki First Person Singular by Murakami Haruki

A collection of eight short stories. I liked ‘Charlie Parker Plays Bossa Nova’ and ‘On a Stone Pillow’ very much. As I have read the original Japanese text I cannot say much about the translation. I love to read Murakami Haruki’s books in Japanese. Some of the stories were published before in ‘The New Yorker’ or in ‘Granta’, some of them are new and exclusively in this book.

I know, short stories are not for everyone, but I like to read them. Murakami explores his past: it is about music (‘With the Beatles’ and Charlie Parker), about mysterious encounters and love in the days of his youth. As expected, the collection is written in Murakami’s unique style about everyday life with magical realistic moments, philosophical and not so philosophical thoughts.

Title in Japanese: 村上春樹: 一人称単数 , 2020.
Translated by Philip Gabriel, Knopf Publishing Group, 2021.

 

The Woman in the Purple Skirt

This is a weird and fascinating story told by a strange narrator: ‘the woman in the yellow cardigan’. The atmosphere is thrilling. You get to know nothing about the narrator’s identity in the first half of the novel. Very quickly you will understand that something is disturbingly wrong because the ‘woman in the yellow cardigan’ is stalking ‘the woman in the purple skirt’, but why?

It was a quick and very interesting read, very Japanese and weird. The female author Imamura Natsuko won the Akutagawa Award in 2019 for this novel. She was born 1980 in Hiroshima and was rewarded many times for her literary works in Japan.

Title in Japanese: 今村 夏子: むらさきのスカートの女, 2019.
Translated by Lucy North, Penguin Books, 2021.

 

An I-Novel
What is it about? The book is a diary, an account, an I-novel, which is a literary genre in its own in Japan. The book was written in English and Japanese alternately. Unfortunately, the bilingual effect could not be transferred into the English translation.

I struggled with the account of the protagonist: a Japanese woman, who immigrated into the US as a child and spent her life there. Japan became a “Sehnsuchtsort”, a place for yearning, impossible to reach for her, an idealized place with sweet memories of her childhood. So, after a while of homesickness and nostalgia she wants to go back to Japan and become a writer.

The text consists mostly of telephone calls with her sister and some backstories. The diary is an account about daily life, grief and depression. Although the title was very promising, I could not relate to the main character of the story because her narration was too depressive in my opinion. Maybe people with a similar experience can empathize more with the author.

Mizumura Minae was born in Tokyo in 1951. She has published several books, which are also translated into English. ‘The Fall of Language in the Age of English‘ and ‚Inheritance from Mother‘ sound interesting.

Title in Japanese: Mizumura Minae 水村 美苗: 私小説 , 1995.
Translated by Juliet Winters Carpenter, Columbia University Press, 2021.

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